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Panjat pinang, a traditional game in Asean. Also known as pole climbing game.

annasiklopedia:

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Traditional Game in Asean - Panjat Pinang

Indonesia

Panjat Pinang is a very unique way of celebrating Indonesia’s Independence Day. Every year, in towns and villages around the country, tall nut-trees are chopped down and their trunks placed vertically, in the center of each settlement. A wheel full of prizes is placed on top, before the trunk is covered with oil or other lubricants, and young men are invited to try and reach the prizes.

This type of pole climbing was introduced to the Indonesians, by Dutch colonists, who came up with it as a form of entertainment. Every time an important event took place (like a wedding, or national holiday) they would install a Panjat Pinang pole and watch the natives attempt to reach the prizes.

Since the nut-tree poles are fairly high and very slippery, a single climber would have almost no chance of reaching the top, so contestants usually work together and split the rewards, if they succeed. Prizes consist of foods, like cheese, sugar, flour, and clothes. You might not think them worth the trouble, but for poor Indonesians, these are luxury items.

Reblogged from: http://www.odditycentral.com/pics/panjat-pinang-a-slippery-tradition-of-thailand.html

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Fire football, a traditional game in Asean. Also known as Sepak Bola Api.
Photo taken from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2215580/Who-wants-goalkeeper-Indonesian-footballers-use-burning-coconut-ball-fiery-60-minute-match.html
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Traditional Game in Asean - Fire Football or Sepak Bola Api

Indonesia

Fire football players prepare for matches for 21 days - praying and fasting and learning to ‘tame fire’.

When they are ready, the tough 60 minutes of football begins - played in bare feet with a burning coconut which has been soaked in kerosene for two days. The players may go through four coconuts before the game is over. They play with bare feet - tackling, taking free-kick and scoring their way to victory in an imitation of World Cup stars.

The teams, which consist of five players, are playing the game in a tradition related to pencak silat, a traditional Indonesian martial art.Match organiser Ali Akhyar said: ‘We make a fireball to test the guts of the students.’

The aim of the pre-match rituals, and the match itself, is to give the players psychological toughness and spiritual strength.The methods aim to make the players ‘heat resistant’, to the point where fire does not burn their skin.

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Traditional Games in Asean: A Documentation

UNESCO documented traditional children’s games in Asean. It’s a gold mine :)

Check it out: http://www.unescobkk.org/culture/ich/children-games/downloads/

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Playing five stones, a traditional game in Asean.

Playing five stones, a traditional game in Asean.

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Traditional Game in Asean - Five Stones

Five stones is played by 2 or more players, using 5 small triangular cloth bags filled with rice, sand or saga seeds. The object is to complete a set of eight steps. The winner is the one completing a set the most number of tries. The game is similar to “jacks” but unlike its Western counterpart, is not played with a ball. A modified version is called “Four stones” which is played with four rather than five bags.

Game Play
Step 1: Throw all five stones. Whilst throwing a stone, pick up one stone and catch the stone in the air before it falls to the ground. Do this for each of the stones on the ground.

Step 2: Repeat step 1 but pick up two stones at a time.

Step 3: Repeat step 1 but pick up a combination of three stones and one.

Step 4: Throw all five stones. Pick up four stones whilst one stone is in the air and catch the later before it falls to the ground.

Step 5: Whilst throwing one stone, place the four on the ground. Throw one stone up again and catch it whilst picking all four stones on the ground.

Step 6: Throw all five stones on the ground. Pick two stones. Throw one in the air and exchange the other with one on the ground. Do the same with the remaining stones on the ground.

Step 7: Throw the two stones held at the end of Step 6. Pick up one stone and then catch the two falling stones separately in each hand. Do this until there is three stones in one hand and two in the other. Throw the two stones and catch it separately. Throw the remaining stone and catch it with the hand that has all the stones.

Step 8: Throw all five stones on the ground. The opponent selects a stone to be thrown in the air. The player has to pick this stone without moving any others. The player throws the stone in the air and picks the remaining on the ground in one clean sweep.

If at any point of time the player fails to complete this set of eight steps, he/she will have to forfeit his turn to his opponent. Upon his opponent’s failure to complete, he will return to the incomplete step, starting from the very beginning of that step.

 

Reblogged from: http://infopedia.nl.sg/articles/SIP_194_2005-01-07.html

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Playing capteh, a traditional game in Asean.

Photo taken from: http://www.edvantage.com.sg/edvantage/photos/1519576/If_you_know_these_games.html

Playing capteh, a traditional game in Asean.

Photo taken from: http://www.edvantage.com.sg/edvantage/photos/1519576/If_you_know_these_games.html

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Traditional Game in Asean - Capteh

How To Play:

The game is played using an object also referred to as a capteh, a rubber disc topped with rooster feathers. The game involves keeping the capteh in the air for as long as possible by kicking it up using the heel of the foot until it is missed or dropped. In the past, homemade capteh were made of old tyre tubes and discarded feathers. The game can be played individually or in a team. Though familiar to Singaporeans as a game of leisure, it has also been played as a competitive game.

When played in a small group, players are judged individually on the number of kicks they make. The players agree on a winning tally of kicks, and the first person in the group to reach that tally, or the player with the highest score in the group, is considered the winner. To decide who plays first, each player kicks the capteh using their heel and without putting the foot down. The one with the highest score before the capteh falls to the ground or their foot touches the ground is the one who starts first. For the game proper, the player kicks the capteh until he misses it or loses his footing. The player is able to put his foot down with each kick. However, he is not allowed to use his hands to touch the capteh.

 

Reblogged from: http://infopedia.nl.sg/articles/SIP_1732_2010-11-26.html

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Playing Luksong Tining, a traditional game in Asean. Also known as Jumping over Thorns.

Playing Luksong Tining, a traditional game in Asean. Also known as Jumping over Thorns.